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APRIL 24, 2014

Quilt Art: Examining the Narrative in Kentucky Quilts

Presented by Dr. Pearlie Johnson, Professor of Pan-African Studies & Art History

As a result of oral history interviews with quilters across Kentucky, Dr. Johnson has gathered a small, yet powerful group of quilters whose work she discusses in her presentation. Her work explores women's history, storytelling, identity politics, and empowerment. Since the onset of Dr. Johnson's study of quilts in Kentucky, this presentation includes quilts made by women of all cultural groups.

Co-sponsored by The Kentucky Humanities Council & The Friends of The McCracken County Public Library

April 24, 2014 | 7:00 pm | 2nd Floor meeting room
All programs are free and open to the public.

Connecting People, Cultures & Ideas
For more information, contact Bobbie Wrinkle
Tel: 270-442-2510 ext. 119 (Toll-free 866-829-7532)
Email: bwrinkle@mclib.net

UPCOMING PROGRAMS:

MAY 8, 2014

Mounds, Mysteries and Marketing – A History of Wickliffe Mounds State Historic Site

Presented by Carla Hildebrand, Park manager of Wickliffe Mounds State Historic Site

The archaeological site of Mississippian Indian mounds in Wickliffe, Kentucky, has fascinated and intrigued visitors and archaeologists for over eighty years. First opened in 1932 by Paducah businessman, Fain King, the site has gone through various transitions, challenges, hundreds of thousands of visitors and is still open to the public as a valuable educational resource. Carla Hildebrand, park manager of the Wickliffe Mounds State Historic Site will present an overview of the sites’ history, mysteries and tourism through the decades.

Carla Hildebrand, park manager of Wickliffe Mounds State Historic Site in Wickliffe, KY, and has been with the site for nearly fifteen years. She received her Master’s degree in anthropology/archaeology at the University of Mississippi (‘Ole Miss) and her Bachelor’s degree in anthropology at Southeast Missouri State University. Ms. Hildebrand is a member of the Kentucky Organization of Professional Archaeologists; and a board member of Kentucky’s Western Waterland. She resides in Paducah with her husband, Christopher.

May 8, 2014 | 7:00 pm | 2nd Floor meeting room
All programs are free and open to the public.

Connecting People, Cultures & Ideas
For more information, contact Bobbie Wrinkle
Tel: 270-442-2510 ext. 119 (Toll-free 866-829-7532)
Email: bwrinkle@mclib.net

JULY 24, 2014

Mounds and Priests, Cathedrals and Popes: Was Wickliffe a Native American Cathedral Town in AD 1250?

presented by Dr. Kit Wesler

Native Americans were building mounds in western Kentucky at the same time as Europeans were building cathedrals.

The Mississippian culture of the Mississippi Valley (AD 800-1400) is defined by sites like Wickliffe, in Ballard County, and Cahokia, Illinois, which shared a culture, a symbolic art, and religious architecture, which we recognize as mounds. Christian Europe can also be defined by a shared culture, symbolic art, and religious architecture (churches and cathedrals). Kit Wesler, professor of archaeology at Murray State University, will talk about his research on the archaeology of medieval cathedrals and Medieval Christendom and how he thinks that comparing Europe to the Mississippian culture is a challenge to typical archaeological thought.

Dr. Kit Wesler is Jesse D. Jones Endowed Professor of Geosciences at Murray State University. He has been studying the archaeology of western Kentucky, especially the Wickliffe Mounds site, for more than 30 years. He received his Bachelor’s degree in anthropology at Washington University in St. Louis, and his Master’s and Ph.D. in anthropology from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. He has conducted research in Eastern North America, West Africa, and Jamaica, and will take a sabbatical in Rome in Spring 2014.

Sponsored by the McCracken County Public Library

July 24, 2014 | 7:00 pm | 2nd Floor meeting room
All programs are free and open to the public.

Connecting People, Cultures & Ideas
For more information, contact Bobbie Wrinkle
Tel: 270-442-2510 ext. 119 (Toll-free 866-829-7532)
Email: bwrinkle@mclib.net

SEPTEMBER 18, 2013

Columbus Belmont -The Gibraltar of the West

Presented By Cindy Lynch, park manager

At one time, national leaders considered moving the country's capital from Washington to Columbus--a nod to Columbus-Belmont's important role in American history. The site was considered a strategic location for control of the Mississippi River, and the struggle to control the river led to the Battle of Belmont on November 7, 1861.

Confederate General Leonidas Polk established camps on both the Kentucky and Missouri sides of the river and named the more heavily fortified Columbus the "Gibraltar of the West." But a Union General destined for the White House, Ulysses S. Grant, outflanked the "Gibraltar" and forced evacuation of the Confederates in 1862.

Today, you can still see the massive chain and anchor used by the South to block passage of Union gunboats and the earthen trenches dug to protect over 19-thousand Confederate troops. The farmhouse that served as a Civil War hospital is now a museum that interprets many historic events at this site.

Cindy Lynch is the park manager at Columbus-Belmont State Park. She has been manager for 20 years, but has 38 years’ service. She is co-chair of the Civil War Days Committee, member of Friends of Columbus-Belmont Group and Hickman Co. Chamber of Commerce. Ms. Lynch is on the Board of Directors of Kentucky Western Waterlands and KY GRRO – the KY Great River Region Organization.

September 18, 2013 | 7:00 pm | 2nd Floor meeting room
All programs are free and open to the public.

Connecting People, Cultures & Ideas
For more information, contact Bobbie Wrinkle
Tel: 270-442-2510 ext. 119 (Toll-free 866-829-7532)
Email: bwrinkle@mclib.net

JUNE 26, 2014

Irvin S. Cobb: Renowned Journalist, Popular Author of Short Fiction, and Always Paducah’s Native Son

presented by Andrew Halford, Professor Emeritus, West Kentucky Community and Technical College

In June 2014, Paducah will celebrate the 138th Anniversary of the birth of Irvin Shrewsbury Cobb, one of Paducah’s most famous native sons. Actually, Cobb wrote, “I would rather be born a homeless orphan in Paducah, Kentucky, than duly certified twins anywhere else on earth.” Important words for this journalist who covered WWI with some of the best first hand reports from behind German lines and who was the most popular writer of short fiction, often in competition with F. Scott Fitzgerald. He never forgot his Paducah roots.

Join Andrew Halford, Professor Emeritus, West Kentucky Community and Technical College, on June 26, 2014 7:00 p.m. for this celebration of the life and accomplishments of Irvin S. Cobb.

Halford became a Cobb enthusiast in 1972 when he began a journey with Dr. Wayne Chatterton who was gathering local material for what is the only literary appraisal of Cobb.

Sponsored by the McCracken County Public Library

June 26, 2014 | 7:00 pm | 2nd Floor meeting room
All programs are free and open to the public.

Connecting People, Cultures & Ideas
For more information, contact Bobbie Wrinkle
Tel: 270-442-2510 ext. 119 (Toll-free 866-829-7532)
Email: bwrinkle@mclib.net