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AUGUST 20, 2015

Baseball in Paducah

Paducah’s Native Baseball Team: A History of Minor League Baseball in Paducah

With author and baseball historian Randy Morgan

Do you remember the old Paducah ballparks such as Wallace Park and Hook Park? How about the Paducah Chiefs?

In this fascinating discussion, Randy Morgan, author of Paducah’s Native Baseball Team, will discuss minor league baseball from the post-Civil War era to about 1960, and the persons involved with the minor league story in Paducah and the surrounding areas.

He will emphasize persons who impacted baseball in our region including: Barney Dreyfuss, Maurice Farnbaker, Harry Lloyd, Ben Tincup, B.B. Hook and Polk Brooks.

Morgan will focus on the successes of the low minor leagues as well as the problems encountered in maintaining professional baseball in small cities.

Randy Morgan has a BS and MA degree from Murray State University. He is retired from the Kentucky Department for Employment Services. Over the past 30 years he has owned interests in minor league baseball teams and helped organize two independent professional leagues.

Morgan is a Paducah, Kentucky native and is a member of the Society of American Baseball Research and the St. Louis Browns Historical Society.

August 20, 2015 | 7:00 pm | 2nd Floor meeting room
All programs are free and open to the public.

Connecting People, Cultures & Ideas
For more information, contact Bobbie Wrinkle
Tel: 270-442-2510 ext. 117 (Toll-free 866-829-7532)
Email: bwrinkle@mclib.net

SEPTEMBER 24, 2015

On Bended Kneeds: The Knight Rider Story

On Bended Knees: The Night Rider Story

Presented by Kentucky Supreme Court Justice & noted Kentucky Author, Bill Cunningham

Few people realize today that the most sustained and violent uprising in America between the time of the Civil War and the race riots of the 1960’s was a farm revolt in West Kentucky and Tennessee between 1904 and 1909. The Night Rider Story targets James B. Duke of North Carolina and Duke’s astounding tobacco empire. The story also tells of an ingenious country doctor who led a highly organized secret fraternity of farmers from Kentucky and Tennessee in a bloody revolt against the impoverishing tobacco prices of the “Duke Trust.” This is the true story of America’s past poverty, wealth, violence, greed, and heroism.

Cunningham is the author of the best seller, On Bended Knees –now in discussion to become a major motion picture. Cunningham has authored six books on regional history, which chronicle the struggles for justice in Western Kentucky since the Civil War. As a contributor to multiple newspapers in the bluegrass, his articles and online blog have helped to inform the public about their legal system, as well as their state’s esteemed history.

Before becoming a member of the state's highest court, Cunningham served as a circuit court judge for 15 years. Cunningham served the court system in several capacities before entering his judicial career. He was the Eddyville city attorney from 1974 to 1991 and public defender for the Kentucky State Penitentiary from 1974 to 1976. He served as Commonwealth's Attorney for the 56th Judicial District from 1976 to 1988. During his tenure in that position, he was voted the Outstanding Commonwealth Attorney of Kentucky by his peers.

Justice Cunningham earned his bachelor's degree from Murray State University in 1962 and his juris doctor in 1969 from the University Of Kentucky College Of Law. He is a veteran of the U.S. Army, having served in Vietnam, Korea and Germany.

September 24, 2015 | 7:00 pm | 2nd Floor meeting room
All programs are free and open to the public.

Connecting People, Cultures & Ideas
For more information, contact Bobbie Wrinkle
Tel: 270-442-2510 ext. 117 (Toll-free 866-829-7532)
Email: bwrinkle@mclib.net

OCTOBER 29, 2015

Ghost Stories

Night Chills –An Evening of Ghost Stories

Presented by acclaimed Kentucky author & storyteller Roberta Simpson

Roberta Simpson Brown is known by fellow storytellers as the "Queen of the Cold-Blooded Tales" for good reason. Her chilling stories are set in familiar, contemporary settings-family rooms, farms, and campgrounds-with an undercurrent of something very, very scary pulling the reader into the undertow of terror.

Storytelling is a great part of our Kentucky heritage. This program will consist of true ghost stories, with special holiday ghost stories included from our new book: Haunted Holidays: Twelve Months of Kentucky Ghosts published by The University Press of Kentucky. Some of the stories will tell of spooky tales connected to long ago Kentucky customs (beekeeping, weather forecasts, turkey drives, pie suppers, berry picking, and chivalries), and others will have current ghostly settings (schools,houses, sinkholes, etc.). The stories will promote the importance of preserving Kentucky stories and passing them on to future generations.

Roberta’s work includes The Walking Trees and Other Scary Stories (nominated for the 1992 Parents’ Choice Award), The Queen of the Cold-Blooded Tales, Scared in School, Strains of Music (a mystery novel written with her sister Fatima), Lamplight Tales, and Spooky, Kooky Poems for Kids (written with her husband, Lonnie E Brown) Her audio tapes, Scary Stories for All Ages and The Scariest Stories Ever are available through August House Publishers. She also has CDs, Creaking Porch Stories and Streamers.

Roberta has appeared in many states coast to coast at parks, workshops, schools, libraries, institutions, the National Middle School Conference, and The Corn Island Storytelling Festival. She has written for Louisville Magazine, and has performed on radio and television (National Public Radio and Voice of America) and The Kentucky Center for the Arts. She has been featured telling one of her own stories on Lifetime TV’s show, Beyond Chance.

She has been a featured author at the Southern Festival of Books in Nashville, the National Storytelling Festival in Tennessee, the Kentucky Book Fair, and the Southern Festival of Books at Bowling Green (along with such notables as Cleveland Amory, R.L. Stine, Earl Hammer, etc.

Roberta and husband Lonnie do paranormal investigations with the Louisville Ghost Hunters and The American Ghost Society.

There will be a question and answer session after the stories, and members of the audience are encouraged to comment or tell stories of their own!

These eerie stories will thrill and excite anyone who loves a good scare !

Co-sponsored by The Kentucky Humanities Council

October 29, 2015 | 7:00 pm | 2nd Floor meeting room
All programs are free and open to the public.

Connecting People, Cultures & Ideas
For more information, contact Bobbie Wrinkle
Tel: 270-442-2510 ext. 117 (Toll-free 866-829-7532)
Email: bwrinkle@mclib.net

NOVEMBER 5, 2015

Journey Stories

Journey Stories: Celebrating the Rich Cultural Heritage of Between the Rivers

Presented by Constance Alexander, Kentucky Writer and Columnist

When dams and bridges were built and the land between the Cumberland and Tennessee Rivers in western Kentucky and Tennessee became Land Between the Lakes, the history and heritage of Between the Rivers communities was disrupted. Families that lived on land that had been handed down the generations since the end of the American Revolution were forced to move, leaving behind homes, businesses, schools and even churches.

Constance Alexander conducted scores of oral history interviews with former residents of Between the Rivers and wrote and edited a documentary radio series based on the interviews. This presentation celebrates the cultural heritage of the people and communities, and focuses on the challenges overcome by the people displaced.

A New Jersey native, Constance has lived in Kentucky since 1988. She completed her undergraduate work at The College of NJ and University of Copenhagen. She has an MA is from Kean University (NJ), an MBA from Pace University (NY), and an MFA in Creative Writing from Murray State University. She is a member of the Dramatists Guild and the Academy of American Poets.

Alexander is an award-winning poet, playwright, newspaper columnist, civic journalist, public radio commentator and arts activist. She currently teaches in the English Department at Murray State University, is a freelance journalist, and is a business consultant specializing in the management of organizational change. She serves on the advisory board of the Institute for Rural Journalism and Community Issues, and is third VP of the Kentucky Historical Society board.

Her work has been recognized for excellence by the Kentucky Press Association, Newspaper Association of America, Pew Center for Civic Journalism, Batten Foundation, Pilgrim Project, Association of Health Care Journalists, the Helmsley Foundation, Ragsdale Foundation, Kentucky Arts Council, and Kentucky Foundation for Women. She is a two-time recipient of prestigious Al Smith Fellowships, in playwriting and fiction.

Co-sponsored by The Kentucky Humanities Council

November 5, 2015 | 7:00 pm | 2nd Floor meeting room
All programs are free and open to the public.

Connecting People, Cultures & Ideas
For more information, contact Bobbie Wrinkle
Tel: 270-442-2510 ext. 117 (Toll-free 866-829-7532)
Email: bwrinkle@mclib.net

DECEMBER 3, 2015

Belle Brezing

Belle Brezing: From the Wrong Side of the Tracks to the Silver Screen

Presented by Doug Tattershall, author of Belle Brezing: American Magdalene

Tattershall will discuss his recent book, American Magdalene: The Redemption of Belle Brezing, which, in its mere 72 pages, manages to put flesh on the bones of the Lexington’s famous Madame.

Belle Brezing is perhaps the most famous madam in the history of the United States. When author Margaret Mitchell needed a hardscrabble woman to serve as confidante to Rhett Butler, her husband told her about Belle Brezing, the Victorian madam of a famous brothel in Lexington, Kentucky. Brezing entered Mitchell’s novel as Belle Watling, but the real Belle’s life story is as dramatic as anything found in the pages of Gone With The Wind. Brezing was born illegitimate, raised in poverty in a violent home, and at age fifteen with a baby in her arms was homeless when her door was padlocked by the landlord after her mother’s funeral. From this desperate childhood, Brezing became rich and famous, operating what Time magazine called “the most orderly of disorderly houses.”

With direct quotes, new insights and the balanced telling of the tale, he breathes new life into a fascinating old story. In his presentation he will detail the information available about Brezing, especially the valuable photographic collection. He will also focus on why there has been so much material collected about Belle.

Doug Tattershall grew up in Lexington, Kentucky, studied journalism and political science at the University of Kentucky, and worked as a news reporter for The Advocate-Messenger in Danville, Kentucky, before working in public relations. Today, he works as a freelance writer and media relations coordinator at the Lexington Public Library.

December 3, 2015 | 7:00 pm | 2nd Floor meeting room
All programs are free and open to the public.

Connecting People, Cultures & Ideas
For more information, contact Bobbie Wrinkle
Tel: 270-442-2510 ext. 117 (Toll-free 866-829-7532)
Email: bwrinkle@mclib.net